Health Services 

Sanction on Iraq

On 13–14 November 1999, over 150 delegates from five countries arrived in Cambridge to attend a conference entitled ‘Sanctions on Iraq: Background, Consequences, Strategies’. In the packed auditorium, they listened as eighteen speakers from four countries – including prominent historians, diplomats, public health specialists, anthropologists, journalists, activists and Iraqi citizens – chronicled Iraq’s manifold suffering under the sanctions regime imposed after the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. In session after session, the audience contributed their challenges, questions, private reflections and professional experiences. The result was an impassioned debate. While the whole dynamic of this dialogue cannot be reproduced in print, the Proceedings offer the speeches that launched it. We invite readers to engage critically with this story of disaster
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Mortality before and after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: cluster sample survey

Findings The risk of death was estimated to be 2·5-fold (95% CI 1·6–4·2) higher after the invasion when compared with the preinvasion period. Two-thirds of all violent deaths were reported in one cluster in the city of Falluja. If we exclude the Falluja data, the risk of death is 1·5-fold (1·1–2·3) higher after the invasion. We estimate that 98 000 more deaths than expected (8000–194 000) happened after the invasion outside of Falluja and far more if the outlier Falluja cluster is included. The major causes of death before the invasion were myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and other chronic disorders whereas after the invasion violence was the primary cause of death. Violent deaths were widespread, reported in 15 of 33 clusters, and were mainly attributed to coalition forces. Most individuals reportedly killed by coalition forces were women and children. The risk of death from violence in the period after the invasion was 58 times higher (95% CI 8·1–419) than in the period before the war.

Health Consequences of the Iraq War

Uploaded on Jun 25, 2009
Dr. F.A. Al-Alusi, Chair of Internal Medicine at Baghdad University, and Dr. Eric Stover, Director of the Human Rights Center at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, examine the health consequences of the Iraq War on combatants and civilians. [6/2009] [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Professional Medical Education] 

World Health Organization Covers Up Iraq War Crimes

Published on Oct 21, 2013
: Abby Martin calls attention to the gross underestimation of Iraq War casualties, and calls out the WHO over a report that blatantly covers up the connection between the use of depleted uranium by occupation forces and congenital birth defects among Iraqis.

Iraqi Physician Brain Drain in Prolonged Conflict 88-98

Brain Drain can also be defined as an emigration of trained and talented individuals from other nations or jurisdictions, due to conflict, lack of opportunity or health hazards where they are currently working and living. Few countries in the world are unaffected by brain drain of healthcare staff as destination or source countries.  Destination countries receive net flows of professionals while source countries lose their professionals, and as we will see in acute Brain Drain in Iraq, at a precipitous cost to the Public Health of Iraqis.


 

Dahr Jamail on Iraqi Hospitals

rain Drain can also be defined as an emigration of trained and talented individuals from other nations or jurisdictions, due to conflict, lack of opportunity or health hazards where they are currently working and living. Few countries in the world are unaffected by brain drain of healthcare staff as destination or source countries. Destination countries receive net flows of professionals while source countries lose their professionals, and as we will see in acute Brain Drain in Iraq, at a precipitous cost to the Public Health of Iraqis.

Iraq President Suddam Hussein Handbook - Page 245

HEALTH AND NUTRITION It is the weakest and most vulnerable who suffer from sanctions young children, pregnant ... UNICEF statistics (Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) carried out by Iraq's Central Statistical Organisation) from ...

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Iraq: Issues, Historical Background, Bibliography - Page 62

Iraq: Issues, Historical Background, Bibliography

Anca Carrington, Kenneth Katzman, Alfred B. Prados - 2003 - Preview
Iraq's health ministry figures indicate that 57,000 children under five die each year. UNICEF statistics (which are generally provided by governments) as published in the State of the World's Children, show an under five mortality rate of 122 in ...

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Iraqi medical education under the intellectual embargo

lancetIraq's health services have declined substantially since the Gulf War and the imposition of United Nations sanctions.1-7 However, the impact of sanctions on the flow of medical and scientific information has received little attention. Iraq was essentially cut off from all outside medical information in 1990 w

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Baghdad Effects of sanctions on Iraq's health professionals

The Lancet 19 April 1997lancet

 Adnan Zaki is a medical registrar at a Baghdad teaching hospital. When he is not working, he should be studying for the Arab Board examination, but most of his spare time is spent working as a welder and a knife grinder in order to sup-plement his meagre wage. Because of the dire economic situation of the country, the Iraqi dinar is now almost worthless and Zaki's monthly salary of 3000 dinar is currently worth only US$2·5. He is forced to supplement this income in any way he can. He now evades ...
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